NEW!

Big Questions in Creativity 2015

Edited by Mary Kay Culpepper & Cynthia Burnett

Because it demands reimagining, reconsideration, and redefinition, change is an essential part of creativity. And in Big Questions in Creativity 2015, the field’s newest thinkers tackle some of its most intriguing questions in the service of promoting change in individuals, organizations, and our sociocultural institutions. As professional facilitators, artists, educators, and change leaders, these authors work to engender creativity in others. The questions they ask—and the answers they find—are key to understanding what creativity is now, and what it may well be in the future.   

Where to Get It

Big Questions in Creativity 2015 is available in multiple formats. Use these links for the format and seller of your choice:

  • Print Edition, $19.95, at amazon.combarnesandnoble.com, or directly from ICSC Press (which gets you a little something extra for free).
  • PDF Edition, $4.95, coming soon
  • Kindle Edition, $4.95, coming soon
  • Library and Tax Exempt Sales: call 716-253-1871 or email editor (at)  icscpress.com

What's in the Book?

Personal Creativity

  • Geoff G. Zoeckler: What is the return on empathy? Can it be used as a Creative Problem Solving tool? 
  • Jane Harvey: Is talking about curiosity an entry point to explaining creativity?
  • Juliana Sánchez-Trujillo and Erica Swiatek: How does playfulness affect adult learning?

Organizational Creativity

  • W. Clayton Bunyard: Does a culture of continuous improvement support creativity and innovation?
  • David Eyman: Are the other benefits of group creativity practices just as important as good ideas?
  • Troy Schubert: What motivational choices might sustain a bottom-up change leader in a large organization? 

 Systems of Creativity

  • Jennifer A. Quarrie: How does nature nurture creativity?
  • Kathryn P. Haydon: What if we view our education system as an ecosystem?
  • Gaia Grant: Can we meaningfully compare creativity across cultures?
  • Courtney Zwart: Design thinking: Is it the only approach we need?